Meet Na'Thaia

Na'Thaia

Workforce Challenge

“Make today better than yesterday. There are always ways to improve yourself,” Na’Thaia Huntley vowed. Since graduating in 2014 from Paul Lawrence Dunbar High School, Na’Thaia has pushed herself forward by following her own advice.

Na’Thaia applied for a summer job through YouthWorks and was invited to be part of the Hire One Youth initiative, the private-sector component of Baltimore City’s summer jobs program. She didn’t really feel like attending the required job readiness training and figured that she would most likely be offered something through YouthWorks. “My sister received her worksite assignment promptly, and for weeks after that I still didn’t know if I would be offered a job at all. I worried that I had made a mistake by not signing on with Hire One Youth. I hadn’t jumped at the opportunity like I should have done,” Na’Thaia shared.

Workforce Solution

Shortly after, her worries ended when she received a phone call directly from a H1Y staff saying there is one more job readiness training, and of course she said yes this time. The next hurdle was that the only jobs still unfilled were in industries that Na’Thaia did not find particularly interesting.     

While she was discussing her options with Ms. Diles, a call came in from Rosedale Federal Bank, who wanted a job-ready youth for the summer. “I instantly got wide-eyed like a little girl in a candy store,” Na’Thaia said.

“My experience at Rosedale was unbelievable. I learned so much about the work that goes on behind the scenes. I loved it and wanted badly to go back the next summer but my parents were no longer available for the one hour commute,” Na’Thaia said sadly. 

And then came the call from H1Y asking if I wanted to attend a bank job-fair, if so I should be prepared to interview with at least three banks,” she explained. In fact, Na’Thaia interviewed with nearly every bank that attended and she was quite worried when two weeks later she hadn’t heard from anyone. Then a call came from Harbor Bank of Maryland and for the second summer in a row she would have a job that she very much enjoyed. She also shared, “The people at Hire One Youth are amazing – passionate about helping youth – especially if the young person is focused. When both people are focused you can really go places,” Na’Thaia believes.

After the summer was over Na’Thaia was offered a part-time position to stay on at Harbor Bank. She is a teller in training and earning higher than minimum wage. She is currently finishing up at BCCC and would like to transfer to University of Baltimore to eventually earn her MBA. She loves money and definitely enjoys talking to people, using her customer service skills.

Na’Thaia had a few suggestions about getting a job such as, “Make sure you ask for and speak with a manager and follow up at least three times.”

Outcomes & Benefits

What’s next according to Na’Thaia,  “Keep studying and to keep working.” Her goals include buying a car, eventually a house and traveling somewhere, maybe California or Miami, Florida. “I might want to work for an airline, or maybe that’s just that I want the free miles,” Na’Thaia said.

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